Toni morrisons the bluest eye essay

Before you even open the book, both racism and beauty are revealed through the title of the book, The Bluest Eye. When the book was written, blonde hair and blue eyed people were the stereotypical portrayal of paramount flawlessness.

Toni morrisons the bluest eye essay

The tone is set immediately: If one is to believe the first-grade primer, everyone is happy, well-to-do, good-looking, and white. One would never know that black people existed in this country.

Toni morrisons the bluest eye essay

For the most part, the blacks in this novel have blindly accepted white domination and have therefore given expensive white dolls to their black daughters at Christmas.

Morrison does not have to retell the story of three hundred years of black dominance by white culture for us to be aware of the history of American blacks, who have been victims in this tragedy.

As noted earlier, a three-hundred-year-old history of people brought to the United States during the period of slavery has led to a psychological oppression that fosters a love of everything connected with the slave masters while promoting a revulsion toward everything connected with themselves.

All cultures teach their own standards of beauty and desirability through billboards, movies, books, dolls, and other products. The white standard of beauty is pervasive throughout this novel — because there is no black standard of beauty.

Standing midway between the white and black worlds is the exotic Maureen Peal, whose braids are described as "two lynch ropes.

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These young men, she is saying, are symbolic of all of the black men who have allowed themselves to be mesmerized by Anglo standards of beauty. As a result, they turn on their own — just as the boys turn on Pecola. Her blackness forces the boys to face their own blackness, and thus they make Pecola the scapegoat for their own ignorance, for their own self-hatred, and for their own feelings of hopelessness.

From the day she is born, Pecola is told that she is ugly.

Toni morrisons the bluest eye essay

Pecola learns from her mother that she is ugly, and she thereby learns to hate herself; because of her blackness, she is continually bombarded by rejection and humiliation from others around her who value "appearance.

Pecola knows only that she wants to be prized and loved, and she believes that if she could look white, she would be loved. If Morrison seems to focus on female self-hatred in Pecola, it is clear that feelings of self-hatred are not limited to black girls alone.

Boys receive just as much negative feedback from the white community, but they are far more likely to direct their emotions and retaliation outward, inflicting pain on others before the pain turns inward and destroys them. Cholly and Junior are prime examples. After the publication of The Bluest Eye, Morrison explained that she was trying to show the nature and relationship between parental love and violence.

The topic of child abuse, once a socially unmentionable subject, remained unaddressed far too long even though everyone knew about it.

When Cholly rapes Pecola, it is a physical manifestation of the social, psychological, and personal violence that has raped Cholly for years.

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His name is "Breedlove," but he is incapable of loving; he is only able to perform the act of breeding. Because he has been so depreciated by white society, he is reduced to breeding with his own daughter, a union so debased that it produces a stillborn child, one who cannot survive for even an hour in this world where self-hatred breeds still more self-hatred.Toni Morrison (born Chloe Ardelia Wofford, February 18, ) is an American novelist, essayist, editor, teacher, and professor emeritus at Princeton University..

Morrison won the Pulitzer Prize and the American Book Award in for regardbouddhiste.com novel was adapted into a film of the same name (starring Oprah Winfrey and Danny Glover) in Morrison was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

- The Importance of the Eye in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye In Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, the characters' eyes are everything. The word "eye" appears over and over with rich adjectives that describe color, movement, and nuance of expression to signify a character's mood and psychological state.

In The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison tells the story of a young African American, Pecola, and the social struggles of the time period, including the difficulties of growing up as a young black woman in the s.

In The Bluest Eye, Pecola Breedlove's father rapes her. When Pecola's baby dies, she goes mad. Pecola spends the rest of her days speaking to her imaginary friend about her blue eyes, which were. In Toni Morrison’s novel The Bluest Eye, Morrison examines what the degradation of people, by society, can result in.

She sets her story in Lorain, Ohio in the ’s, which is a society with white ideals and standards of beauty. Toni Morrison - the Bluest Eye This Research Paper Toni Morrison - the Bluest Eye and other 64,+ term papers, college essay examples and free essays are available now on regardbouddhiste.com Autor: review • November 14, • Research Paper • 4/4(1).

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