Islamic writing

In time, the letters of the Arabic script, with the addition of a few new letter forms, were also used to write in Persian, Turkish and other languages, as well as Arabic. This required that the Arabic script be standardised. We know that the standard form of script was in use by the end of the 7th century. It was employed, for example, on the first surviving monument of Islamic architecture, the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, built in AD

Islamic writing

Islamic writing Arabs gave to a large part of the world not only a religion - Islam - but also a language and an alphabet. Where the Muslim religion went, the Arabic language and Arabic writing also went.

Arabic became and has remained the national language - the mother tongue - of North Africa and all the Arab countries of the Middle East.

Even where Arabic did not become the national language, it became the language of religion wherever Islam became established, since the Quran is written in Arabic, the Profession of Faith is to be spoken in Arabic, and five times daily the practicing Muslim must say his prayers in Arabic.

Today, therefore, one can hear Arabic spoken - at least for religious purposes - from Mauritania on the Atlantic, across Africa and most of Asia, and as far east as Indonesia and the Philippines. Of those people who embraced Islam but did not adopt Arabic as their everyday language, many millions have taken the Arabic alphabet for their own, so that today one sees the Arabic script used to write languages that have no basic etymological connection with Arabic.

The languages of Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan are all written in the Arabic alphabet, as was the language of Turkey until some fifty years ago. It is also used in Kashmir and in some places in the Malay Peninsula and the East Islamic writing, and in Africa it is used in Somalia and down the east coast as far south as Tanzania.

The basmalah "In the name of God the Merciful the Compassionate" - the opening words of the Quran is here done in an elaborate thuluth script with the letters joined so that the entire phrase is written without lifting the pen from the paper.

It is generally accepted that the Arabic alphabet developed from the script used for Nabataean, a dialect of Aramaic used in northern Arabia and what is now Jordan during roughly the thousand years before the start of the Islamic era.

It seems apparent that Syriac also had some influence on its development. The earliest inscription that has been found that is identifiably Arabic is one in Sinai that dates from about A. Another Semitic script which was in use at about the same time and which is found on inscriptions in southern Arabia is the origin of the alphabet now used for Amharic, the official language of Ethiopia.

The Arabic alphabet has twenty-eight letters additional letters have been added to serve the needs of non-Arabic languages that use the Arabic script, such as those of Iran and Pakistanand each of the letters may have up to four different forms.

History Of Calligraphy | regardbouddhiste.com

All of the letters are strictly speaking consonants, and unlike the Roman alphabet used for English and most European languages Arabic writing goes from right to left.

Another significant difference is that the Arabic script has been used much more extensively for decoration and as a means of artistic expression. This is not to say that the Roman alphabet and others such as the Chinese and Japanese, for instance are not just as decorative and have not been used just as imaginatively.

Since the invention of printing from type, however, calligraphy which means, literally "beautiful writing" has come to be used in English and the other European languages only for special documents and on special occasions and has declined to the status of a relatively minor art.

Another basmalah in ornamental thuluth script is written in the shape of an oval. In the countries that use the Arabic alphabet, on the other hand, calligraphy has continued to be used not only on important documents but for a variety of other artistic purposes as well. One reason is that the cursive nature of the Arabic script and certain of its other peculiarities made its adaptation to printing difficult and delayed the introduction of the printing press, so that the Arab world continued for some centuries after the time of Gutenberg to rely on handwriting for the production of books especially the Quran and of legal and other documents.

The use of Arabic script has therefore tended to develop in the direction of calligraphy and the development of artistically pleasing forms of hand lettering, while in the West the trend has been toward printing and the development of ornamental and sometimes elaborate type faces.

Another and perhaps more important reason was a religious one. The Quran nowhere prohibits the representation of humans or animals in drawings, or paintings, but as Islam expanded in its early years it inherited some of the prejudices against visual art of this kind that had already taken root in the Middle East.

In addition, the early Muslims tended to oppose figural art and in some cases all art as distracting the community from the worship of God and hostile to the strictly unitarian religion preached by Muhammad, and all four of the schools of Islamic law banned the use of images and, declared that the painter of animate figures would be damned on the Day of Judgment.

Wherever artistic ornamentation and decoration were required, therefore, Muslim artists, forbidden to depict, human or animal forms, for the most part were forced to resort either to what has since come to be known as "arabesque" designs based on strictly geometrical forms or patterns of leaves and flowers or, very often, to calligraphy.

· Fred M. Donner, Narratives of Islamic Origins: The Beginnings of Islamic Historical Writing (Princeton: Darwin Press, ) Islamic culture has a long and rich tradition of historical writing, which many scholars believe regardbouddhiste.com  · Egypt’s written and spoken language is Arab, so the Islamic writing is an Arabic one.

The script utilized for an Aramaic dialect in the Nord Arabia as well as a small proportion of Syriac are the origins of the Islamic regardbouddhiste.com Write an Islamic Will; Write an Islamic Will Why Islamic Will? How to Make Will? “It is the duty of a Muslim who has anything to bequest not to let two nights pass without writing a will about it.” (Sahih al-Bukhari) Why make an Islamic Will?

To fulfil an important religious regardbouddhiste.com://regardbouddhiste.com Islamic calligraphers have experimented endlessly and have been extremely imaginative. Another distinctive Turkish contribution is the tughra, an elaborate and highly stylized rendering of the names of the Ottoman sultan, originally used to authenticate imperial regardbouddhiste.com://regardbouddhiste.com You searched for: islamic calligraphy!

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Islamic writing

No matter what you’re looking for or where you are in the world, our global marketplace of sellers can help you find unique and affordable options. Let’s get started!regardbouddhiste.com  · Islamic cultures are among the most interesting, complex, and dynamic in the world.

At the same time, they are among the least known in the West. From its dramatic rise in the seventh century A. D. to the present, Islamic civilization has covered a large part of the globe, incorporating many regardbouddhiste.com

Islamic Education in Africa